During the past couple of weeks I have received several messages from guys asking me why I have bareback sex when it’s so risky. I’ve been called crazy, nuts and insane along with a string of other things, so I would like to address this particular issue. It’s definitely an interesting area to explore and I’m always happy to delve further into the subject of bareback sex. I am a barebacker because I enjoy the sensation created by skin-on-skin contact and I also enjoy exchanging cum as part of my barebacking encounters. This is my personal choice and I have made myself aware of the risks of having unprotected sex and I am comfortable with the level of risk I expose myself to by being an active barebacking participant.

Those who say that bareback sex is a risky sexual activity are absolutely correct, because having anal sex without using a condom is considered the riskiest form of sexual intercourse a person can have. Risky situations are also a part of many other aspects of everyday life, but the level of risk with barebacking can vary depending upon a number of factors. One thing is for certain – having bareback sex can potentially expose you to sexually transmitted infections if you engage in unprotected sex with a person who is infected. This is why, in my own life, risk-assessing is an important step towards trying to avoid exposure to sexually transmitted infections.

Some people assume that gay and bisexual men are sluts and have sex with every guy they see. This belief is immediately proven to be incorrect when according to an article at About.com, a Senior Research Fellow at The Williams Institute of Sexual Orientation Law and Public Policy has said that a recent government survey found that 4 percent of adults aged 18-45 identified as homosexual or bisexual and that if you define gay as having same-sex attractions or behaviors, you get proportions that are closer to the one in ten figure. So let’s use the one in ten figure, or 10 percent in this example. That means people who believe that gay and bisexual men have sex with every guy they see are only right approximately 10% of the time and wrong 90% of the time (and these figures need to be adjusted because females would have also been included in these statistics). Some gay and bisexual men do have a considerable number of sexual encounters with other guys, but it’s important to note that this is not the case for every male.

The type of sexual partner plays an important role in determining the level of risk a barebacker can be exposed to. If you are looking at high risk situations, then this can relate to anonymous sex, unprotected sex whilst under the influence of drugs such as crystal meth, or having sex without condoms with multiple bareback partners at orgies, gang bangs or parties. The level of risk is reduced if you remove the previous types of sexual encounters and replace them with regular fuck buddies who you can trust and the risk levels reduces even further if you only have sex with your partner in a monogamous relationship structure. Of course other considerations such as HIV testing, sero-sorting, discussing STD status and even the health of an individuals immune system can also play an important role in risk assessing.

When you analyze sexual health statistics (which I have done in previous articles here), it is clear that the number of new HIV infections are the highest for men who have sex with men (MSM) and I have always wondered about these results. Gay and bisexual men are constantly being subjected to safer sex messages (which is a good thing) and I believe that this is where the focus (or blame) is being projected when it comes to HIV infection rates. I also think that some heterosexuals are of the opinion that they are immune from contracting HIV based on comments I have read online. This is why I am of the opinion that there may actually be more HIV transmission cases taking place between heterosexuals than what is being reported, because heterosexuals are probably not getting themselves tested as frequently as homosexuals and if they are transmitting HIV because they unaware they are infected, then they are spreading the virus more than the current statistics show.

As gay and bisexual men tend to get tested for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections more often due to our awareness of sexually transmitted infections, this could be one of the reasons why the infection rate statistics are so high, but I am only able to speak generally on this topic based on my thoughts alone, as I do not have any statistics to back this up and that’s because I am not aware of any research which has been undertaken in this area. It would be interesting to find out the percentage of homosexuals getting tested compared with the percentage of heterosexuals getting tested and then use these findings to to work out the ratios of infections by adjusting the figures using this data, but this data is not being captured to my knowledge.

Something else people fail to consider is that barebacking is happening more in the heterosexual community than in the homosexual community based on numbers alone. I am not trying to create a separation between heterosexuals and homosexuals, I am just making an observation based on statistics and demographics, because we are all human and are considered as one. Some people may argue that it’s perfectly acceptable for heterosexuals to engage in bareback sex because this is necessary for the natural reproduction life cycle and that’s a reasonable conclusion to make, but if this is the case, then does this mean that heterosexuals only have unprotected sex based on the number of children they create or attempt to create? I think not. As much as we may not like to think about it, those of us conceived naturally involved our parents engaging in unprotected sexual intercourse, so you could say that for those of us conceived naturally, our parents are actually barebackers and we are a product of barebacking. Interesting hey?

It’s quite clear that there are many people are engaging in unprotected sex all around the world every day. I would like to point out that I totally respect condoms and the people who use them, but I don’t use them myself based on a personal choice. I can see that condoms can be useful in situations where there is a high level of risk involved, but I would choose to forgo having unprotected sex in these situations rather than using a condom and that’s my personal choice and a choice that’s probably different for other people.

As a barebacker, I have made myself aware of the risks involved with barebacking and I have chosen to have bareback sex with my partner of ten years. We consider ourselves to be in an open-minded relationship, where we have discussed the possibility of having sexual experiences with other guys if it ever eventuated. We don’t specifically seek sexual encounters with other guys, but if the opportunity came up for either of us, we agree that it’s perfectly acceptable to participate in sexual encounters outside our relationship. Whether this would involve bareback sex is another issue, because the whole risk determination would need to be made, considering all the options, including benefits and consequences of barebacking.

Guys who consider themselves to be barebackers need to explore a number of considerations before they have bareback sex if they are HIV-negative and want to remain this way, although even as careful as one might be, it’s still possible to become HIV-positive. It’s a similar issue for HIV-positive guys, as there are other strains of the virus in existence, plus there are other sexually transmitted infections involved with barebacking too. I have put together a few considerations for HIV-negative barebackers and many of these points could also be considered by HIV-positive barebackers, but I recommend that HIV-positive barebackers follow the professional guidance they receive from their medical professionals, rather than the suggestions below.

Some Considerations for HIV-Negative Barebackers:

  • Educate yourself: make yourself aware of the pros and cons of barebacking and research sexually transmitted infections as well as precautions you can take.
  • Partner structure: choose a sexual partner based on the level of risk you are comfortable with such as anonymous guys, casual sex, fuck buddies, or a long-term partner to adjust the level of risk.
  • Exposure frequency: the more often you have unprotected sex the more exposure you have to sexually transmitted infections.
  • HIV testing: regular HIV testing every three to six months is important to stay on top of your HIV status and this also helps you provide more accurate health status to potential sexual partners.
  • Sero-sorting: aim to have sex with other guys who have the same HIV status as yourself. This also includes sero-sorting for other sexually transmitted infections as well.
  • Health and fitness: try to keep your immune system as healthy as possible. This includes ensuring that your body gets enough rest each day, eating a healthy diet, participating in regular exercise, drinking enough water and avoiding drugs, alcohol and cigarettes.
4 Comments
Seaguy October 9, 2011 at 1:56 am Reply

Very well written and stated post Brad!

Brad Berrigan October 9, 2011 at 5:10 am Reply

Thanks for your feedback Seaguy, I really appreciate it.

Nolan January 20, 2013 at 8:59 am Reply

There are those, thanks to the propaganda of the late 1980s – 1990s, that believe that sex without condoms means you’re going to get HIV or other STIs.

This is only possible (and I use the word “possible” intentionally) if the person you’re having sex with HAS HIV, etc. Even if you have sex with someone who is HIV+, this is not a guarantee that you’ll become infected. Having bareback sex in a monogamous/exclusive relationship with a partner that is HIV/STI-free puts you at no risk, for example though “condom queens” will often tell you differently.

I’m a strong believer in a person making an educated decision. That means if you find someone you want to fuck bare, you need to have “the talk” and find out their status. Ask, and decide what level of risk is acceptable to you.

Brad Berrigan January 21, 2013 at 2:21 am Reply

Thank you for contributing to this topic Nolan. I appreciate the important points you have raised and I also believe strongly in people making informed decisions.

There are some people who are quick put those who have bareback sex in a high-risk category, without taking into consideration a number of variables that can determine the level risk. It’s views from some of these people that can make barebackers feel ashamed and unwilling to discuss bareback sex.

I encourage open-communication on this topic at my blog and it’s refreshing to read your comments Nolan. I hope others will also feel comfortable discussing bareback sex here. I have created this blog as a platform that’s all about barebacking and I want barebackers and/or viewers of bareback porn, or those interested in the subject of bareback sex to know that this is a place where interaction is welcome.

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